Turtle Island Restoration Network has launched a research project to determine if a computer algorithm can do what the human eye can’t— recognize individual sharks.

Studying wildlife populations underwater, especially of highly migratory species like hammerhead sharks, has been problematic for scientists and has prevented basic understanding of population dynamics necessary and critical to the conservation of shark species around the world.

TIRN has teamed up with Charles Stewart, Professor and Chair Computer Science Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic, and Jason Holmberg from Wild Me to create the Hammerhead Photo ID project using computer vision and deep convolutional neural networks.

If successful, the Hammerhead photo ID project will transform our knowledge of marine species and improve our understanding of population size, longevity, site residency, and movement of sharks. Furthermore, using historical photos, we will able to look back in time and estimate shark populations of the past so we can better understand the declines that make these species endangered today.

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Scientists Document First Evidence of Hammerhead Shark Swimming Between Cocos Island National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount

| Cocos Island, Cocos Island Research Expedition, Cocos-Galapagos Swimway, Headquarters, News Releases, Sharks | No Comments
Researchers tag a thresher shark at Las Gemelas Seamount to track its movements. For Immediate Release, March, 27, 2020 Contacts: Elpis Chavez, Centro Rescate de Especies Marinas Amenazadas, echavk@gmail.com  Todd…

Attempts to Establish Hard Caps on West Coast Drift Gillnet Fishery Questionable

| California, Driftnets, Marine Mammals & Seabirds, News Releases, Sea Turtles, Sharks | No Comments
For Immediate Release February 24, 2020 Contact: Annalisa Batanides Tuel, (408) 621-8113, atuel@seaturtles.org Attempts to Establish Hard Caps on West Coast Drift Gillnet Fishery Questionable ROHNERT PARK, Calif. — After…

Is There Slavery in Your Seafood?

| Hawaii, Longlines, Marine Mammals & Seabirds, Sea Turtles, Sharks | No Comments
As we near the end of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention month, I wanted to remind our dedicated supporters like you that despite the fact that we're living in…