• Mercury: From Source to Seafood

    Learn more about doctors and groups that address mercury poisoning (Got Mercury does not imply any implicit or explicit endorsement) How Does mercury Enter

  • Brain Neuron Degeneration via Mercury

    This video from the University of Calgary demonstrates the toxic effect methyl mercury has on neurons.  

  • Wild Oats Mercury in Seafood Sign

    Wild Oats took a leadership role on mercury in seafood issues by voluntarily posting this mercury sign at seafood counters in all of their

  • Hawaii Mercury in Seafood Brochure

    Mercury in Seafood Brochure from Hawaii Department of Health. Given to families on the WIC program. It warns women and children about mercury in

Fact Sheets

  • sea-turtle-on-beach-WEB

    Sea Turtle Ecology Course $19.95

    Graceful in the water, sea turtles glide through the ocean with the greatest of ease and trek to far away beaches to ensure continuation of their species.

    Through this fun online course you will investigate the history of these marine reptiles, both natural and anthropogenic threats to their survival, reproduction, and how they cope with the challenges they face. You will explore all seven living sea turtle species and by the end be able to identify them!

    Proceeds of sales benefit Turtle Island Restoration Network and our efforts to save sea turtles!

    Please click on the picture of the sea turtle below to purchase and participate in the online Sea Turtle Ecology course.

  • Photo by Jonathan R. Green (CDF/ DPNG)

    Whale Shark Fact Sheet

    Whale shark: Rhincodon typus  

    Life History and Distribution

    Whale sharks are the world’s largest fish and can grow up to 20m in length. They are found worldwide in tropical and temperate waters.

     These large fish utilize a viviparous method of reproduction, meaning they give birth to live young. This was discovered when a female whale shark was harpooned off the coast of Taiwan in 1995 and she was carrying 300 yolk-dependent embryos.

    Whale sharks have large, gaping mouths that enable efficient filter feeding. They eat mainly plankton and small fish.

    Threats 

    Whale sharks are listed as vulnerable on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List. This is due mainly to many human-caused factors such as overfishing, bycatch in fishing gear, and illegal poaching.

     One whale shark fin can be sold for up to $15,000 for human consumption or for ornamental uses. The fins and meat are sold to restaurants to make food, the skin is used to make bags, and the oil is sold to make fish oil supplements. Legal fishing for whale sharks is banned in most countries, but still allowed in some Asian countries.

    Due to their slow nature, whale sharks are vulnerable to becoming entangled in fishing gear unintentionally. They often die from not being able to move water over their gills, or die from being pulled onto the boat in the net. Animals with such large body structures often cannot support their weight out of the water.

    Importance

    In the past two decades whale sharks have become increasingly important for tourism, especially in developing island nations in their dive and snorkel industry. Popular sites for whale shark tourism are Philippines; Mexico; Ningaloo, Australia; the Red Sea; and Utila, Honduras. The whale sharks viewed in these areas are typically foraging aggregations of small males.

     Until recently, almost nothing was known about these animals in the Eastern Tropical Pacific besides regular sightings of large individuals in the Galapagos by dive tourists. This is area is critical not only for a healthy ecotourism industry, but also for whale shark research to gain more insight into their migrations and reproductive cycles in order to establish critical habitat according to their life history.

For Kids & Classes

  • sea-turtle-on-beach-WEB

    Sea Turtle Ecology Course $19.95

    Graceful in the water, sea turtles glide through the ocean with the greatest of ease and trek to far away beaches to ensure continuation of their species.

    Through this fun online course you will investigate the history of these marine reptiles, both natural and anthropogenic threats to their survival, reproduction, and how they cope with the challenges they face. You will explore all seven living sea turtle species and by the end be able to identify them!

    Proceeds of sales benefit Turtle Island Restoration Network and our efforts to save sea turtles!

    Please click on the picture of the sea turtle below to purchase and participate in the online Sea Turtle Ecology course.

  • #savemarinscoho

    Join The Coho Photo Campaign!

    Join our Coho Photo Campaign!

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    Easy as 1,2,3…..

    1) Take a photo holding up a sign that says why you think it is important to protect coho.

    2) Upload your photo to social media and use the hashtag #SAVEMARINSCOHO

    3) Get your friends to join, and exponentially increase your impact!

    Below is the link to our sentence starter but feel free to make your own: PhotoCampaign_coho

    Please make sure to share it with us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/salmonprotection?fref=ts

  • images-2

    Make Your Own Sea Turtle Costume!

    Materials:

    • 1 or 2 large cardboard box/cartons. I get these from appliance stores or bicycle shops
    • 8 1-2″ wide strips of fabric about 1-2 ft. long. I got fabric from a thrift shop, old sheets or bed spreads work well for this (try to find a color that is similar to your turtle).
    • Quart of exterior house paint (possibly some Z-prime for an undercoat depending on quality desired).
    • A heavy-duty stapler with 3/8″ staples. Stapler needs to be the long handled heavy duty type. Staples longer than 3/8″ tend to bend and come back through the cardboard creating a sharp, snagging hazard.

    Click here to download and view the full instructions.

    Sea Turtle Costumes in Action (pictured below):

    images-1imagesChevron_STRPgroup2011

  • cocos whaleshark

    Cocos Island Gallery

    Cocos Island National Park in Costa Rica is known worldwide as an ocean haven for spectacular sharks, rare sea turtles, whales and abundant marine wildlife. But even World Heritage status has not stopped commercial fishers from invading these treasured waters.

    Turtle Island is working to demand that Costa Rica protect Cocos Island National Park create a protected area that connects all the way to Ecuador’s waters, northeast of the Galapagos Islands. These two nations could create one of the world’s largest protected ocean zones, and save the endangered leatherback turtle from extinction.

    And now you can help us! We welcome experienced divers who want to participate in our ongoing research to help tag and track sea turtles and sharks in the Cocos Islands. You will get hands-on opportunities to capture turtles and attach satellite and acoustical transmitters and to tag and photograph hammerhead sharks underwater.