We’re working with our partners to demand that Costa Rica protect Cocos Island National Park by creating one of the world’s largest protected ocean zones: The Cocos-Galapagos Swimway. It will be the first known bilateral marine protected area, connecting the national parks of two sovereign nations and protecting highly migratory species.

The Cocos-Galapagos Swimway is an area of ocean rich in biodiversity, measuring approximately 120,000 sq. km, that follows the Cocos Ridge – an underwater mountain range that links the Galapagos and Cocos Marine Reserves. Recent studies have demonstrated that sharks and turtles use the swimway to migrate between the marine reserves, putting them at grave risk to industrial fishing.

Turtle Island Restoration Network and our partners propose a bilateral initiative to protect the Cocos-Galapagos Ridge Swimway between Ecuador and Costa Rica.

Help us save turtles and sharks by creating the Cocos-Galapagos Swimway.

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The Cocos–Galapagos Swimway went from a concept promoted by Turtle Island Restoration Network Executive Director Todd Steiner, to a full-fledged strategic alliance that will help protect migratory species in the Eastern Tropical Pacific. We are delighted to be partnering with MigraMar, Pacifico, the governments of Costa Rica and Ecuador, Turtle Island Restoration Network and others to promote sound science and policy changes in the region.

Zdenka PiskulichExecutive Director, Costa Rica Forever

Updates

Photo by Kevin Weng

Report: Volunteer Divers, Scientists Tag Sharks on December Cocos Expedition

| Cocos Island, Cocos Island Research Expedition, Eastern Tropical Pacific, Sea Turtles, Sharks | No Comments
In December, a crew of volunteer divers, marine biologists, scientists, and dive masters joined Turtle Island Restoration Network (TIRN) on one of the organization’s yearly research expeditions to Cocos Island…
Using scuba and a six-foot pole spear, Turtle Island Restoration Network's Executive Director Todd Steiner placed an acoustic transmitter below the tiger shark's dorsal fin in order to monitor its habitat use at Cocos Island National Park. The tag will monitor the shark’s movements for two or more years. | Photo by Turtle Island Restoration Network.

Bay Area Scientist Successfully Tags Aggressive Tiger Shark Linked to Diver Death in Costa Rica

| California, Cocos Island, Cocos Island Research Expedition, Headquarters, News Releases, Sharks | No Comments
Using scuba and a six-foot pole spear, Turtle Island Restoration Network's Executive Director Todd Steiner placed an acoustic transmitter below the tiger shark's dorsal fin in order to monitor its…

TIRN Awards Scholarship for Upcoming Cocos Island Research Expedition

| Cocos Island, Cocos Island Research Expedition, Cocos-Galapagos Swimway, Eastern Tropical Pacific, News Releases | No Comments
Olema, CA — Turtle Island Restoration Network (TIRN) has awarded a scholarship to an early career marine conservationist who will help TIRN study, tag, and track sharks and sea turtles…

Shop Online. Save Sea Turtles.

| Cocos Island Research Expedition, Got Mercury?, Marine Mammals & Seabirds, Sea Turtles, Sharks | No Comments
The holiday's are just around the corner and if you are like me you are starting to think about what gifts to give to loved ones during winter celebrations. This…

TIRN Announces Second Conservation Scholarship Winner for 2017 Dive Expedition

| Cocos Island Research Expedition, Headquarters | No Comments
For the first time ever, Turtle Island Restoration Network (TIRN), a global marine conservation nonprofit, has offered two scholarships to early career marine conservationist for its yearly Cocos Island Research…

TIRN Announces Conservation Scholarship Winner for 2017 Dive Expedition

| Cocos Island Research Expedition, Headquarters, Sea Turtles | No Comments
For the first time ever, Turtle Island Restoration Network (TIRN), a global marine conservation nonprofit, has offered a scholarship to an early career marine conservationist for its yearly Cocos Island…