Turtle Island is a leading advocate for endangered sea turtles – from tiny Kemp’s ridley hatchlings in the Gulf of Mexico to gentle, giant Pacific leatherbacks off the California Coast.

Our science-based programs protect nesting beaches, stop deadly fishing practices, and halt other threats to sea turtle survival through hands-on conservation and effective advocacy. Join us to help save sea turtles!

Make a membership donation and take action today!

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    End California’s Driftnet Fishery

    Mile long invisible driftnets for swordfish and sharks also capture and drown endangered sea turtles and a myriad of other species. Help us call for an end to California's deadliest fishery.

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    Creating the Cocos-Galapagos Sea Turtle Swimway

    Join us on a scuba diving research expedition to Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica to tag sea turtles and to understand their migrations. This data will be used to advocate for a protected swimway.

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    Nesting Beach Protection Program

    Many species of sea turtles could go extinct in our lifetime – unless we take action. To prevent this crisis, sea turtles need to be protected throughout their lifecycles.

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    Protecting Sea Turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

    Turtle Island’s Gulf of Mexico Office protects endangered sea turtles and biodiversity throughout the Gulf. Learn more and join us!

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    Defending Sea Turtles in the Pacific Ocean

    Setting over 45 million baited hooks/year for swordfish and tuna, Hawaii longliners capture and drown four species of Threatened and Endangered sea turtles. Help us reform this destructive industrial fishery.

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    Sea Turtles & Climate Change

    The time to act is now. Help us build resilient sea turtle populations, restore key ocean and beach habitat and ensure the long-term survival of these ancient species, while we reduce the impacts of oil and gas emissions and drilling.