We protect endangered, wild coho salmon and the forests and watersheds they need to survive in Marin County, California.

January 14, 2020

Surveys Underway to Evaluate Salmon Redd Habitat Value

What We Do

SPAWN was initiated as part of Turtle Island Restoration Network in 1997. Each year, we engage hundreds of people to see and learn about the majestic endangered salmon, restore watershed habitat, raise native redwood trees, and study salmon health.

Research & Monitoring

December 5, 2018

Assist Landowners

November 27, 2018

Acquire Critical Land

November 27, 2018

Save California’s Coho Salmon

Save California’s Coho Salmon

November 16, 2018

Creekwalk Tours

November 14, 2018

Plant 10,000 Redwoods

November 9, 2018

Native Plant Nursery

November 9, 2018

Lagunitas Creek Floodplain & Riparian Restoration Project

April 18, 2018

Why It Matters

The population of Central California Coast coho salmon has declined more than 95 percent from historic levels, and are now listed as ‘endangered’ under the Federal Endangered Species Act. Running through Marin Couty, Lagunitas Creek Watershed is one of the most important waterways left for these wild coho salmon, supporting 10 to 20 percent of the surviving fish. Our programs span the Lagunitas Creek Watershed—from the redwood valleys of Mt. Tamalpais to the coastal waters of Tomales Bay—and include projects to protect salmon, redwoods, and amphibans from a myriad of threats like dam-building, vegetation removal, urban encroachment and the threat of climate change from fossil fuel projects. Each gives the public a chance to get involved in our species-saving efforts. As part of our network, you are giving our creeks and aquatic wildlife a vital lifeline to their survival and resilience. You are making a difference for our blue-green planet.

What You Can Do

We need your help to ensure endangered salmon survive and thrive.

Join Our Network
Support Our Work
Volunteer With Us

Latest News

Surveys Underway to Evaluate Salmon Redd Habitat Value

| California, Coho Salmon, Salmon, Salmon Population Monitoring, Tocaloma Floodplain Restoration Project | No Comments
By Bryce King, Habitat Restoration Intern SPAWN is conducting substrate classification, embeddedness, and scour chain studies to gauge the current redd habitat value for salmonids in Lagunitas Creek. The Salmon…

SPAWN to Offer California Naturalist Training This Winter

| California, Coho Salmon, News Releases, Salmon | No Comments
SPAWN’s California Naturalist Training Course begins February 11 at SPAWN’s headquarters on Golden Gate National Area in Olema. For Immediate Release January 15, 2020 Contact Harry McGrath, (415) 254-7185, hmcgrath@seaturtles.org…

California’s Coho Salmon Spawning Numbers Plummet

| California, Coho Salmon, News Releases, Salmon, Salmon Population Monitoring | No Comments
This graph includes coho spawning redd (nest) data collected in Lagunitas Creek from 1995 through 2019. Each point on the graph represents the 3-year geometric mean (annual average number of…

Lawsuit Challenges Loopholes in Obama-era Rule Exempting Wetlands and Streams from Clean Water Act Protections

| California, Gulf of Mexico, News Releases, Salmon | No Comments
Turtle Island Restoration Network launched a lawsuit challenging exemptions for industries in an Obama-era “waters of the United States” rule that could open the door to more pollution of wetlands,…

SPAWN Announces 2019-20 Coho Salmon Creekwalk Tours

| California, Coho Salmon, Creekwalk Tours, News Releases, Salmon | No Comments
Each winter, SPAWN offers the Bay Area community the chance to experience one of Marin County’s most magnificent natural phenomenon: the local population of endangered coho salmon returning from the…

PHOTOS: Endangered California Freshwater Shrimp Utilize Structures in Lagunitas Creek

| California, Tocaloma Floodplain Restoration Project | No Comments
Photo by Harry McGrath In late October, SPAWN used visual observation and underwater cameras to record endangered California freshwater shrimp using habitats specifically designed for them, which could be the…