We protect endangered, wild coho salmon and the forests and watersheds they need to survive in Marin County, California.

June 8, 2021

Pollinator Power: New Habitat for Monarchs at Bolinas-Stinson School

What We Do

SPAWN was initiated as part of Turtle Island Restoration Network in 1997. Each year, we engage hundreds of people to see and learn about the majestic endangered salmon, restore watershed habitat, raise native redwood trees, and study salmon health.

Roy’s Pools Fish Passage and Floodplain Restoration Project

May 22, 2020

Research & Monitoring

December 5, 2018

Assist Landowners

November 27, 2018

Acquire Critical Land

November 27, 2018

Save California’s Coho Salmon

Save California’s Coho Salmon

November 16, 2018

Creekwalk Tours

November 14, 2018

10,000 Redwoods

November 9, 2018

Native Plant Nursery

November 9, 2018

Lagunitas Creek Floodplain & Riparian Restoration Project

April 18, 2018

Why It Matters

The population of Central California Coast coho salmon has declined more than 95 percent from historic levels, and are now listed as ‘endangered’ under the Federal Endangered Species Act. Running through Marin County, Lagunitas Creek Watershed is one of the most important waterways left for these wild coho salmon, supporting 10 to 20 percent of the surviving fish.

Our programs span the Lagunitas Creek Watershed—from the redwood valleys of Mt. Tamalpais to the coastal waters of Tomales Bay—and include projects to protect salmon, redwoods, and amphibans from a myriad of threats like dam-building, vegetation removal, urban encroachment and the threat of climate change from fossil fuel projects. Each gives the public a chance to get involved in our species-saving efforts.

What You Can Do

We need your help to ensure endangered salmon survive and thrive.

Join Our Network
Support Our Work
Become a Volunteer

Latest News

Pollinator Power: New Habitat for Monarchs at Bolinas-Stinson School

| California, Native Plant Nursery, News Releases | No Comments
Each winter, small populations of monarch butterflies overwinter in Bolinas, California. With only 1,194 monarchs recorded overwintering on the coast this past winter, the number of Western Monarch butterflies overwintering…

Edible Native Plant Garden Supports Sustainable Community

| Native Plant Nursery, Salmon | No Comments
Written by Eleanor Clark, SPAWN’s native plant nursery intern We live in a country where 30-40 percent of food produced a year is wasted, excessive amounts of resources are spent…

Print Your Own Protest Signs to Save California’s Tule Elk!

| Wildlife Monitoring | No Comments
Use the artwork of Turtle Island Restoration Network to show your support for a national, grassroots campaign to save the endemic tule elk of Point Reyes National Seashore from being…