Turtle Island Restoration Network is headquartered in California, where we are a leading advocate for endangered sea turtles, whales, salmon, and more.

For nearly 30 years, our efforts have safeguarded endangered Coho salmon and engaged the public in our conservation efforts through education, outreach, classroom visits and other habitat protection efforts.

Action Alert

December 12, 2018

Tell Congress to Oppose Potentially Deadly Seismic Airgun Blasting and New Offshore Drilling

Our Campaigns

The Salmon Protection And Watershed Network (SPAWN)

November 16, 2018

10,000 Redwoods

November 9, 2018

Ban California Driftnets

May 24, 2018

End Longline Overfishing

project exerpt test

Lagunitas Creek Floodplain & Riparian Restoration Project

April 18, 2018

Take Action!

December 12, 2018

Tell Congress to Oppose Potentially Deadly Seismic Airgun Blasting and New Offshore Drilling

May 16, 2018

Protect Sea Turtles, Say “No” To Balloons

April 23, 2018

Support a Bill to Buy Out Driftnet Fishing Permits

California Updates

TIRN Urges Congress to Address the Threat of Climate Change

| California, Climate Change, Headquarters, Protect Nesting Beaches | No Comments
WASHINGTON—Turtle Island Restoration Network (TIRN) joined more than 600 environmental groups on Thursday to call on the US House of Representatives to pursue ambitious climate legislation that matches the scale…
Using scuba and a six-foot pole spear, Turtle Island Restoration Network's Executive Director Todd Steiner placed an acoustic transmitter below the tiger shark's dorsal fin in order to monitor its habitat use at Cocos Island National Park. The tag will monitor the shark’s movements for two or more years. | Photo by Turtle Island Restoration Network.

Bay Area Scientist Successfully Tags Aggressive Tiger Shark Linked to Diver Death in Costa Rica

| California, Cocos Island, Cocos Island Research Expedition, Headquarters, News Releases, Sharks | No Comments
Using scuba and a six-foot pole spear, Turtle Island Restoration Network's Executive Director Todd Steiner placed an acoustic transmitter below the tiger shark's dorsal fin in order to monitor its…
Staff and volunteers of the Salmon Protection and Watershed Network (SPAWN) removed garbage and debris from the remains of a camp in Lagunitas on Friday, Jan. 4 that would otherwise be carried downstream by forecasted storms. | Photo by Turtle Island Restoration Network

Volunteers Prevent Harmful Debris From Polluting Lagunitas Creek During Storm

| California, Coho Salmon, Creekwalk Tours, News Releases, Salmon, Salmon Population Monitoring, Uncategorized | No Comments
Staff and volunteers of the Salmon Protection and Watershed Network (SPAWN) removed garbage and debris from the remains of a camp in Lagunitas on Friday, Jan. 4 that would otherwise…

World’s Most Endangered Large Whale Species Harmed by Trump-Approved Seismic Blasts in Atlantic

| California, Headquarters, Marine Mammals & Seabirds | No Comments
Earlier this month, the Trump administration gave the green light to oil and gas companies to use seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean to search for fossil fuels in…

As U.S. Airbase Construction Starts in Okinawa, Legal Action Aims to Save Endangered Dugongs

| California, Headquarters, Marine Mammals & Seabirds, News Releases | No Comments
SAN FRANCISCO—As workers prepare to begin construction of a new U.S. military base in Henoko Bay in Okinawa, Japan, Turtle Island Restoration Network (TIRN) is gearing up for legal action…

SPAWN Receives Grant for Streamside Landowner Assistance

| California, Coho Salmon, Habitat Restoration & Landowner Assistance, Headquarters, News Releases, Salmon | No Comments
Olema, Calif. – The Salmon Protection and Watershed Network (SPAWN) received a grant from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Fisheries Restoration Grant Program to place numerous fallen trees, logs,…